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Lake


  • Family Friendly

  • Swims

  • Endurance

A rare inland beach, very clear excellent water quality with special roped off areas for children to swim.

From the Farnham Community Website:

Four self guided walks, and a short wheelchair friendly route, start from the Ranger's office at the Great Pond, where there is also an information room. A limited programme of events is held over the summer

In the summertime, many families use the shallow water to swim in and the beach is a great place for the children to try their hand at building sandcastles!

This is a crowd-sourced map. Abilities vary, and conditions change. Always assess risks for yourself before getting in.

Possible Blue-green algae problems in high Summer. Please check before swimming.

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Swimmer descriptions

  • Added: 13/01/2014

    Frensham Great Pond is part of Frensham Common, a 1000 acre area of woodland and heathland owned by Waverley District Council. You can usually swim in Frensham Great Pond in the summer, in a roped off area. There is also a sandy beach making it very popular with families. The car park is usually full by noon (and you will not be able to park on the lanes that access Frensham Ponds as these roads are designated as Rural Clearways), so arrive early to avoid disappointment, or take public transport – there’s a bus from Farnham Station. It is close to bathers in the event of a bloom of blue-green algae. There’s a ranger on duty at weekends but no lifeguards. there are no lifeguards, so take care if you’re going swimming.

    There have been some issues with swimmers going outside the designated area, leading to the following statement from Waverley Council: Waverley Borough Council: "Please bear in mind that the rest of the pond, outside the designated and marked swimming areas is out of bounds to swimmers. The pond is leased to anglers and sailors. Increasing numbers of complaints and threats to swimmers are being received at the Rangers office, especially towards triathlon type swimmers using the pond for training. This location is unsuitable for this style of swimming and is meant more as a recreational facility."

  • Added: 21/10/2016

    A superb venue for distance swimming, particularly during the closed fishing season mid-March to mid-June, when you can stay close to the eastern edge, where it's too shallow to sail.

    The proximity of the car park and the easy entry/exit on a shallow sandy beach make this venue particularly suitable for cold water swimming.

    When the boats are not out (events published on the sailing club website), the bouys form very convenient loops of up to a mile. Most of the lake is shallow enough to stand in.

    Would strongly recommend a towfloat for visibility.

    This is a crowd-sourced map. Abilities vary, and conditions change. Always assess risks for yourself before getting in.

    Had the odd note on my windscreen, and a number of chats with sailing marshals in RIBs who will try to insist you can only swim within the designated areas. Most wind their necks in when you politely disagree, and the more persistent grumps can easily be ignored if you stick to the eastern part.

    With the increasing popularity of open water swimming, the rangers, sailors and fisherman now broadly accept they share the lake with swimmers. The great majority are perfectly friendly. There is no need to let the occasional busybody and daft signage prevent experienced swimmers from enjoying this stunning body water outside of the rather inadequate designated areas.

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