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Sea


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Freshwater Bay on the Isle of Wight is in a stunning location with beautiful clear water. If the tide is not high then you can swim from one side to the other. At each side there are caves which are lovely to swim into. You have to take care of the rocks below, but it is managable to negotiate them. It is not recommended to swim over to them if the tide is low as there are lots of submerged rocks. It is surrounded by high cliffs which give a superb view from in the water. It is a shingle beach which is steep in places to gain access. (A bit like Dover) But it is well worth it when in. Snorkling is great too. Divers regularly dive there.

When the sea is calm it is one of the most beautiful swims.
  • Tides

This is a crowd-sourced map. Abilities vary, and conditions change. Always assess risks for yourself before getting in.

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Swimmer descriptions

  • Added: 13/08/2014

    The Bay is my favourite swimming spot. A good high tide swim is from the west side of the bay to the stack at the east side. There is even a small ledge where you can sit and take in the scenery.

    Usually in the summer months it is flat and perfect for swimming. Locals regularly swim in the mornings between 7 and 9 if you want company.

    This is a crowd-sourced map. Abilities vary, and conditions change. Always assess risks for yourself before getting in.

    The beach shelves fairly steeply into deeper water and there are rocks on both sides of the bay although these are well below the surface at half to high tide. At low tide the stack is dry or at least shallow water with rocks below the surface.

    Freshwater Bay is also a good surf spot when waves break off the rocks on the west side into the bay and next to the stack. A rip current then runs across the bay and out past the stack. If you don't know how rips work don't swim if the surf is running.

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